Dakota Grammar by Franz Boas

By Franz Boas

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In 1644, the aged Opechancanough led his people in one more assault against the colonists, killing some 400 and taking many prisoners. Yet again, the Powhatans did not follow up on their successful initial attack, enabling the English to regroup. The colonists now took the offensive, killing some natives, forcing many others to flee, and selling prisoners as slaves. By 1646, the Powhatan empire was no more, and Opechancanough was killed while an English prisoner. His successor agreed to a treaty stating that he held his lands as a subject of the king of England, to whom he even paid a modest annual tribute.

The Spanish in the American Southwest The desert north of Mexico contained mostly nomadic peoples, with several semisedentary societies thriving along river basins. The Spanish settled this vast, largely desolate area only because of its substantial silver deposits. For several decades the colonists had little military success against the nomadic tribes, which fought with bows and arrows and used ambushes. Ultimately, these tribes accepted treaties that required them to settle in villages under Spanish missionaries in return for a stipulated amount of European goods each year.

In 1644, the aged Opechancanough led his people in one more assault against the colonists, killing some 400 and taking many prisoners. Yet again, the Powhatans did not follow up on their successful initial attack, enabling the English to regroup. The colonists now took the offensive, killing some natives, forcing many others to flee, and selling prisoners as slaves. By 1646, the Powhatan empire was no more, and Opechancanough was killed while an English prisoner. His successor agreed to a treaty stating that he held his lands as a subject of the king of England, to whom he even paid a modest annual tribute.

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