Food for the gods : new light on the ancient incense trade by D. P. S. Peacock, A. C. S. Peacock, David Williams

By D. P. S. Peacock, A. C. S. Peacock, David Williams

The tale of incense is among the such a lot fascinating in either japanese and western tradition. From the 1st millennium BC to the state-of-the-art it's been wanted and valued on a par with invaluable metals or gem stones. even supposing incense was once a luxurious, it was once ate up in prodigious amounts by means of the traditional global, in temples and at funerals, but additionally in inner most houses. The papers in this quantity examine the position of incense, basically - notwithstanding no longer solely - in the course of the Roman interval. it's was hoping that they're going to offer a place to begin for extra study into this very important, yet missed, sector of social and financial archaeology.

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Food for the gods : new light on the ancient incense trade

The tale of incense is among the so much exciting in either jap and western tradition. From the 1st millennium BC to the latest it's been wanted and valued on a par with useful metals or gemstones. even supposing incense used to be a luxurious, it was once ate up in prodigious amounts by way of the traditional international, in temples and at funerals, but additionally in inner most houses.

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Timna’ was also the inland terminus for the Indian and far-eastern luxuries that were transported from the coast at Aden. Aden was the principal port of the Qatabanian kingdom, and one of the most important harbours on the international trade network. Ships from the east–mainly from India, Sri Lanka and south-east Asia–arrived at ports all along the South Arabian coast, but Aden, which the Greeks called Arabia Emporion, or ‘Arabia’s emporium’, was for several centuries the most important port for the trade in luxury goods between Arabia, Africa and the east.

Clumps of trees growing close together, or in a particular wadi, are known as a manzilah or ‘grove’. For centuries, and until very recently, every manzilah was owned by a certain family, who had the right to harvest the trees. ’ Pliny goes on to describe the method of harvesting; a technique that had changed little, it seems, from the days of Theophrastus writing in the 3rd century BC, and which remains remarkably similar to the harvesting techniques still in use today (Fig. 3). Pliny writes: ‘They make an incision where the bark appears to be fullest of juice and distended to its thinnest; and the bark is loosened with a blow but not removed.

6 Bi’r ‘Alī Settlement (ancient Qana’). Area VI, ‘lower’ (BA-I) period, plan of excavated structures. Fig. 7 Bi’r ‘Alī Settlement (ancient Qana’). Area VI, pottery of the ‘lower’ (BA-I) period. Fig. 8 Bi’r ‘Alī Settlement (ancient Qana’). Area VI, pottery of the ‘lower’ (BA-I) period. Fig. 9 Bi’r ‘Alī Settlement (ancient Qana’). Area VI, pottery of the ‘lower’ (BA-I) period. Fig. 10 Bi’r ‘Alī Settlement (ancient Qana’). Area VI, pottery of the ‘lower’ (BA-I) period. Fig. 11 Bi’r ‘Alī Settlement (ancient Qana’).

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