"We Are Still Here": American Indians Since 1890 by Peter Iverson, Wade Davies

By Peter Iverson, Wade Davies

In addition to revisions and updates, the second one version of “We Are nonetheless Here” positive factors new fabric, seeing this well-loved American heritage sequence quantity continue its remedy of yank Indians within the 20th century whereas extending its insurance into the outlet many years of the 21st century.

  • Provides scholar and normal readers concise and fascinating insurance of latest background of yank Indians contributed by way of most sensible students and teachers within the field
  • Represents an excellent complement to any U.S. or local American survey text
  • Includes a very updated synthesis of the most up-tp-date literature within the field
  • Features a complete Bibliographical Essay that serves to help pupil study and writing
  • Covers American Indian heritage from 1890 via 2013

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"We Are Still Here": American Indians Since 1890

As well as revisions and updates, the second one version of “We Are nonetheless right here” positive aspects new fabric, seeing this well-loved American heritage sequence quantity preserve its remedy of yankee Indians within the twentieth century whereas extending its assurance into the outlet many years of the twenty first century. offers pupil and common readers concise and interesting assurance of up to date heritage of yankee Indians contributed by way of best students and teachers within the fieldRepresents a terrific complement to any U.

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Example text

He also resisted the kinds of changes being imposed upon his people. Like Smith, he denied the authority of the federal government to negate the sovereignty of the Native community. The acceptance of an allotment, Chitto Harjo contended, was a break with tribal custom, and those who did so would no longer be members of the Muscogee nation. Accordingly, his followers harassed and punished those who did take allotments. Finally federal officials, supported by US cavalry, stepped in to quash resistance and for a time imprisoned in Leavenworth the man who had reasserted the power of traditional Native law.

In order to accomplish the goal of assimilation, policy-makers had segregated Indians on separate enclaves. They assumed such arrangements were temporary. As Indians disappeared as separate, identifiable groups, then reservations would vanish as well. Henry L. Dawes wanted to expedite the process. The senator from Massachusetts sponsored legislation that gained approval in 1887 as the General Allotment (or Dawes) Act. Allotment or division of Indian communal or tribal lands into individually owned 32 “We Indians Will Be Indians All Our Lives,” 1890–1920 parcels was an old idea, dating back to 1633 in New England.

Federal off-reservation schools could not remain the only alternative for Indian students. Many parents exerted pressure for their children, especially the youngest ones, to be able to attend school closer to home. It cost too much to transport students to distant institutions, and Christian missionaries 26 “We Indians Will Be Indians All Our Lives,” 1890–1920 wanted to have students attend schools run by their respective denominations. Sympathetic commissioners of Indian Affairs sometimes promoted contract schools.

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